HCA 13/72 f.99v Annotate

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Transcription

the better remembreth them for that hee kept a Journall as aforesayd
And further to these articles hee cannot depose./

To the 12th article hee saith hee well knoweth that the Golden Cock was
but a single sheathed shipp and was eaten and wrought through with
wormes by reason of her long staye in the East Indies (which is a thing
frequent with shipps that continue longe in the Indies) And saith the sayd
shipp continued tight and staunch for about twenty moneths after her
departure from Gravesend as aforesayd soe that hee is well assured
that if the Master and Company of her had returned with her out of
the Indies timely enough to have arrived with her at London within
eighteene moneths next after such her first departure from
Gravesend shee might very well have arrived in safety at London
without being necessitated to make use of any or at least very little other materialls or
provisions than what shee carried outward And further to this article
hee cannot depose./

To the 13th article hee saith that the Golden Cock aforesayd was in being
till the twenty nynth day of October one thousand sixe hundred fifty
sixe which was the day that shee sunke as aforesayd soe that shee was
in the service of the arlate Canham Paige and Thompson from
the tyme of her departure from Gravesend which was the tenth day of
december one thousand sixe hundred fifty fower till the sayd 29th of
October which is two and twenty moneths or neere thereabouts And
further to this article hee cannot depose/

To the 14th hee saith hee well knoweth that when the sayd shipp arrived at
Bantam outward bound and had there discharged her outward ladeing
the winde and weather served well for her returne thense for London and
it was not by reason of any fowle weather or contrary windes that
that shee did not returne but meerely because the master
traded up and downe in the Indies from port to Port and would not
returne though his company were very desyrous to have return
from thense for England And hee saith that if the sayd master would [then GUTTER]
have taken in a ladeing and returned for England soone after his comming
first thither and dischargeing of his outwards cargo there hee might have
accomplished his voyage back to London within farr lesse tyme than
eighteene moneths from the tyme of her setting out from Gravesend [afore GUTTER]
sayd and the shipp had not then layne in the Indies soe longe as shee did
by eight or nyne monethes for shee discharged her outward ladeing there
in the latter end of August 1655 and continued tradeing up and downe
in the Indies to Pallum Bam and Jambee as aforesayd till the twenty
nynth of October one thousand sixe hundred fifty sixe much against the
desyre of this deponent and of the rest of the shipps company and so the [XXX GUTTER]
of their health and losse of the shipp as aforesayd And further to this article
hee cannot depose/

To the 15th hee saith that the sayd shipp (in his this deponents Judgment
at the experation of the eighteene moneths from the tyme of the sayd shipps
departure from Gravesend upon the voyage in question was with the
[laX GUTTER]

Topics

People


Thomas Canham

  • Thomas Canham had a commercial relationship with John Paige from at least as early as 1651


- "48. [John Paige] to William Clerke
28 Sept. 1651
… May please to take notice that I have disposed of 6 chests of your indigos unto Mr Thomas Canham at 4s 8d per lb, to pay at 6 months' time. And after the bargain was made, I found him inclining to recant, saying that Antonio Fernandez [Carvajal] sold at 4s 2d per lb, which was very true, insomuch that I was fain to take half with him rather than to have them turned down upon my hands. We sent them for Lisbon where they were sold very well, as it happened, 750 réis per lb. There remains yet 8 chests in cellar and one chest campechena grain. As for your lignum rhodium, I cannot dispose of one t for money nor upon truck, insomuch that I doubt warehouse room will eat out the principal. Besides, it dries very much. I would willingly dispose of it upon any reasonable terms. Those chests indigo which remain unsold are the best of all the parcels. I proffered them at 4s 2d per lb garbled but cannot get above 4s per lb and at time [i.e. to be paid for later]. So that now I am resolved to keep them until I hear from you again because for future when you send me any goods, pray give me such order as that I may send them to any place where I shall think most convenient for your most advantage, if you can repose so much confidence in me. If you think it convenient, I will send them for Lisbon for your account. Of this, pray 2 words per first opportunity."[1]

- "66. [John Paige] to William Clerke
4 Jan. 1653
a. My last unto you was per Capt. Harwood [the Agreement] of 15 Nov., to which crave reference. Since, I have received yours of 22 Oct. per the Turned-out frigate. I have paid up Shorton £10 for account of Diego Benitez per your bill of exchange. I here send you the apothecary's bill by which you may see what those medicines amount unto, as also I send you the account of what Don Carlos' coach cost here first penny. You may charge him with freight, insurance and my commission. I hope it will be little inferior to the [Capt.] General's coach which cost £50 more. It hath cost me no small trouble to have all things exact according to order. I have bought you a large carpet which shall send over per first.

I should be very glad to hear that you had bought up a round quantity of wines as you writ me would do suddenly after Mr Straw's [the Turnedout's] dispatch, which, if you had given me advice thereof per Mr Webber [the Blessing], I would have adventured to charge you with some tonnage in this ship [the Golden Star, Capt. John Holman]. But not knowing your mind makes me forbear doing it. I have taken 80 ts in this ship to carry away a parcel of rye which I bought in Plymouth about 3 months since. Mr Rowland Wilson hath 70 ts and Mr Canham 40 ts. Now in case the ship carry any more than abovesaid tonnage, then my father-in-law hath privilege to load it. I have written him 2 words to that purpose that he spare you room for 20 or 30 pipes if possible he can, for I know this ship is 220 ts. Of this I thought good to give you a hint by reason there is now an opportunity to get money by wines which there may not be another year. I hope you have reserved some of the Duraxno wines to send home for your account.[2]

  • Thomas Canham's venture with Maurice Thompson and John Page in the East Indies was noted by G.F. Steckley in his introduction to his edition of John Paige's letters


- "His first endeavours as a merchant to the East were less successful. In September 1654 he had signed Maurice Thomson's petition which called for a freer Eastern trade in which individuals might send private adventures independent of the Company. Then he joined Thomson and Thomas Canham in such a voyage. They hired the Golden Cock, a ship of 85 tons owned by Richard Ely and Paige's cousin John Paige of Plymouth, and set her out in November for Bantam. The ship stopped at Tenerife for the vintage and had delivered wines safely to Bantam by August 1655. There she was freighted by the Company to carry pepper from Sumatra to Bantam, but in October 1656 was leaking so badly from worm damage that she was scuttled in the Jamboaye River. And in November 1657 Paige's own cousin was suing him, Thomson and Canham in the Admiralty Court to recover the value of the ship and freight due. (fn. 108)

Fn. 108 = H.C.A. 13/72, exam. of John Edwards, 13 Nov. 1657, 24/113/58."[3]

  • Thomas Canham MAY have been a barber-surgeon as well as a merchant, though this is unproven and was doubted in Boyds


FAMILY SEARCH COMMUNITY TREES

"Thomas Canham[4]

Born: St. Mary, Woolnoth, London, Middlesex; date unknown
Died: Date unknown
Notes:
- OCCUPATION: Barber-Surgeon; Master, 1668.
- DISTINCTION: Citizen of London.
- OCCUPATION: Merchant.
- NOTE: Boyd's 'Citizens of London' record no. 1819 questions citizen, barber-surgeon and master.
Children:
- Sarah: c. 29 Jul 1645, St. Mary, Woolnoth, London, Middlesex; bur. 6 Nov 1650, St. Mary, Woolnoth, London, Middlesex
- Mary: c. 12 Jan 1645/46, St. Mary, Woolnoth, London, Middlesex; bur. 12 Mar 1702/03, St. Helen, Bishopsgate"

  • Thomas Canham may have married Mary Stead, widow, and eldest daughter of Leonard Hamond, ca. 1653, or alternatively this may have been his son


"BOND

Bond between Thomas Canham, Peter Marolios and Mathias Datselear of London, merchants, and Leonard Hamond the elder of London, for £3000 as part of marriage settlement for marriage of Thomas Canham and Mary Stead, widow and eldest daughter of Leonard Hamond. Inc. refs. to lands within 80 miles of City of London (no details) (For further ref. to Thomas Canham see D/DMh T45)"[5]

SEE ALSO:
- C 6/162/104 Short title: Jackson v Canham. Plaintiffs: Thomas Jackson. Defendants: Thomas Canham and Mary Canham his wife. Subject: will of the deceased Thomas Stead, of Middlesex. Document type: bill, answer. 1663
- C 6/325/41 Short title: Canham v Hamond. Plaintiffs: Thomas Canham, Samuel Warner and Katherine Warner his wife. Defendants: Thomas Hamond. Subject: marriage settlement, and lands in Great Waldingfield, Edwardstone, and Groton, Suffolk. Document type: bill, answer. 1693
- C 5/82/92 Short title: Datcheler v Canham. Plaintiffs: Mary Datcheler widow. Defendants: Thomas Canham, Ambrose Canham and John Canham. Subject: money matters, Surrey. Document type: bill, answer. SFP. 1686
- C 5/83/9 Short title: Datcheler v Canham. Plaintiffs: Mary Datcheler widow. Defendants: Thomas Canham and others. Subject: property in Southwark, Surrey. Document type: bill only. SFP. 1687

SEE ALSO:

"15 Oct. 1668 Lord Chief Justice Vaughan(s), Baron Atkyns, Justice Wylde(s).
Thomas Canham, merchant, and Mary his wife v. Mary Steede, an infant."
The petition stated that John Steede of Lambeth, late husband of ... [NO MORE TEXT VISIBLE IN GOOGLE SNIPPET]"[6]

"12 Oct 166?X. Lord Chief Baron(s), Justice Archer(s), Justice Morton(s).
Michael Rolles, merchant taylor, v. Thomas Canham, merchant, John Canham and Mary his wife, Sarah and Elizabeth Canham, John Wedloe and Katherine Ward, his widow...."[NO MORE TEXT VISIBLE IN GOOGLE SNIPPET]"[7]

  • The earliest plausible reference to Thomas Canham, merchant of London, is from the early/mid-1630s


- "Canham, John, gent., bachelor, 24 and Anne Warner of Water Belchamp, co. Essex, spinster, 20, daughter of Henry Warner, deceased, her mother's consent, attested by Thomas Canham, of the Old Jury, merchant — at Water Belchamp aforesaid. 31 Jan. 163?4?/?5. B

Canham, John, of London, merchant, bachelor, about 26, about 36 and Mrs. Mary Canham...COMPLETE THIS ENTRY"[8]

ths occupied by Edmond Harvey and one of 5 hearths occupied by Richard Clay. At this time the remainder of 14 appears to have been part of the same house as 105/15 and 95/1 (see below). (fn. 25)"[9]

Places


SEE ALSO:
- C 6/325/41 Short title: Canham v Hamond. Plaintiffs: Thomas Canham, Samuel Warner and Katherine Warner his wife. Defendants: Thomas Hamond. Subject: marriage settlement, and lands in Great Waldingfield, Edwardstone, and Groton, Suffolk. Document type: bill, answer. 1693

  • Willan (1976) notes that firm of Thomas Canham & Co. was one of the few London based wine suppliers which supplied both French and Spanish wines[10]


  • Thomas Canham was elected a Committee of the English East India Company for the year 1662-1663


- "The Governor declares that the following have been elected Committees for the ensuing year : George, Lord Berkly, Sir Andrew Riccard, Sir William Thompson, Sir John Lewis, Sir Anthony Bateman, Sir Richard Ford, Sir Thomas Bludworth, Sir George Smith, Sir Stephen White, John Jolliffe, Arthur Ingram, John Bathurst, Maurice Thompson, Robert Lant, Samuel Barnardiston, Christopher Boone, Peter Vandeput, Thomas Kendall, Francis Clarke, John Mascall, Thomas Winter, Christopher Willoughby, Thomas Canham, and Stephen Langham. (f p.)[11]

- "Messrs. Vandeput and Canham are requested to go bail for Samuel Barnardiston in the suit of Rag and Traveisa, and the Company will save them harmless."[12]

- "Messrs. Willoughby and Canham are requested to be bound on the Company's behalf to stand to the order of Chancery to be made upon hearing after the return of the commission to examine witnesses in India in the matter depending between Mr. Buckeridge and the administrators of Colonel Rainsford."[13]

  • Thomas Canham had property interests in Cheapside in a property called the 'Frying Pan', through his wife, the former Mary Stead, who had inherited it from her father


"105/13

In 1591 this was known as the Frying Pan and was inhabited by Robert Cutt, citizen and ironmonger. Robert Cutt purchased the property from John Osborne, esquire, Treasurer's Remembrancer in the Exchequer, and was still dwelling there in 1602. At his death in 1610 Cutt left his dwelling house in Cheapside to his son Henry Cutt for a term of 21 years rent-free after the death of his wife Anne, who died in 1612. The house was inhabited in 1612 by Mrs. Agnes Cutt, who may have been Henry's widow. The property was later in the possession of Robert's son, William Cutt, citizen and goldsmith, who in 1618 leased it to James Foote and Nicholas Homewood for a term of 15 years at a rent of £6. 13s. and for a sum of £1063. 6s. 8d. payable in annual instalments of £73. 6s. 8d. (the sum would thus be paid in 14 1/2 years). Homewood and Foote were assessed jointly for parish contributions between 1619 and 1624 and perhaps shared the house between them. Homewood was dwelling in the house in 1624, when William Cutt sold the messuage formerly known as the Crown and now known as the Frying Pan with its shops, cellars, chambers, rooms, yards, warehouses, and garrets to Thomas Stead, citizen and girdler, for £980. Homewood, an ironmonger whose name is also given as Honiwood, died in 1633-4, when he may still have lived in this house; he left his leases to his son Nicholas Honywood, a minor. Excepted from the grant of 1624 was a cellar measuring 19 ft. (5.79 m.) in length towards the N. from the street and 12 ft. 7 in. (3.84 m.) in breadth; it lay beneath a shop occupied with the house to the E. (105/14-15). Included in the grant were the garrets formerly part of 95/1 and lying over the room in 105/13 called the 'Brushing Chamber', with the stool serving the house of office there; the landlords of 105/13 and 95/1 were each to be allowed access to the other's property for carrying out repairs. In 1638 this house, valued at £24 a year, was inhabited by Mr. Brome. (fn. 22)

Thomas Stead died in 1641-2, leaving the Frying Pan to his son, John Stead, later known as John Stead, gentleman. The property was inherited by John's daughter, Mary Stead of Teddington (Middx.), spinster, who in 1669 sold the toft where the Frying Pan had stood before the Great Fire to Thomas Canham of London, merchant. At the time of the Fire the messuage had been occupied by one Broome, presumably the Mrs. Katharine Broome who had a house of 6 hearths here in 1662-3 and 1666. It was proposed to take part of the site for the new street of King Street, and later in 1669 Canham and his wife Mary (who was identical with Mary Stead) sold the toft to a group of feoffees acting on behalf of the Corporation of London. The plan accompanying this deed records the boundaries both of the whole property and of the strip of ground to be laid into King Street.22 These boundaries have been adopted in the reconstruction, although another survey of about the same date shows a slightly different arrangement of the boundary between 105/13 and 95/1. (fn. 23)

105/14

In 1602 this house was occupied by Mr. Marshall, who was probably the Richard Marshall, painter-stainer, named in 1624 as a former tenant. The Mrs. Marshall dwelling there in 1612 was presumably his widow. The property may have been rebuilt in 1615 (see 95/15). Between 1619 and 1624 Thomas Reeve appears in parish assessment lists in the position suitable for the occupant of this property. In 1619 Edmund Chapman may have shared the property with him. In 1624, when the house included a shop once part of 13 (q.v.) and possibly the cellar beneath the shop, the property had formerly been known as the Brush and was now known as the Queen's Head and was held, presumably from John Osborne, by one Foster. In 1638 the house, occupied by Mr. Sheaphard, was valued at £38 a year. (fn. 24)

Osborne's property had passed to Theophilus Biddulph by 1646, when Biddulph began to pay the Corporation 4s. rent for 2 stalls or bulks on each side of his shop in Cheapside next to Ironmonger Lane which had presumably been erected on the street. Biddulph last paid this rent for the year 1667-8; he was probably living in a house on the site of 105/14-15 and 95/1 in 1654 and 1659, but by 1662-3 had been succeeded as resident by Peter Birkenhead (see below, 105/15). The rebuilding of the property after the Great Fire was undertaken for George FitzJefrey, for whom a foundation was surveyed on the corner of Cheapside and Ironmonger Lane. A strip of ground 3 ft. 4 in. (1.02 m.) wide by Cheapside and 2 ft. 6 in. (762 mm.) wide at the N. end was cut off in order to enlarge the lane. The foundation was shown to adjoin Canham's property (105/13) to the W., but evidently included structures fronting on to King Street and occupying the greater part of what remained of Canham's property after the street was laid out. From another survey it seems that the S.W. part of this property was immediately before the Fire in the tenure of Mr. Knight, evidently the John Knight who in 1666 occupied a house of 6 hearths here. In 1662-3 this house may have been represented by a house of 2 hear

Sources

Primary sources


HCA=

HCA 15/6 Box One. Charterparty, dated November 7th 1654, Unfoliated. 1. John Paige and Richard Ely of Plymouth merchants partowners of the Golden Cocke of Plymouth, Richard Chappell Master; 2. Thomas Canham, John Paige and Maurice Thompson of London Merchants. To go to such places within and without the Streights from the Port of London, starting at Gravesend"===HCA====

HCA 15/6 Box One. Charterparty, dated November 7th 1654, Unfoliated. 1. John Paige and Richard Ely of Plymouth merchants partowners of the Golden Cocke of Plymouth, Richard Chappell Master; 2. Thomas Canham, John Paige and Maurice Thompson of London Merchants. To go to such places within and without the Streights from the Port of London, starting at Gravesend" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.



Non-HCA


Thomas Canham

TNA

ADM

ADM 106/315/68 W. Bodham, Clerk to Woolwich Ropeyard. Receipt of letter and he gives an account of hemp not yet delivered by Richard Hutchinson, Mr. Nutt & Mr. Trench, Joseph Martin, Jo. Wanderhove, Thomas Canham and Mr. Martin. 1675 Jan 29
ADM 106/332/3 Navy Board: Records. IN-LETTERS. Miscellaneous. Thomas Canham. Peter Dam, Shoemaker, pressed on board the Reserve, is a Stranger who is not naturalized. 03 June 1678

cHANCERY

C 3/325/95 Short title: Shuker v Canham. Plaintiffs: Henry Shuker . Defendants: Thomas Canham . Subject: money matters, Suffolk . Document type: [pleadings]. 1621
C 3/429/23 Short title: Shuker v Canham. Plaintiffs: Humphrey Shuker. Defendants: Thomas Canham, Frances Canham his wife and others. Subject: tenement etc (not specified)in Suffolk. Document type: bill only. 1642

C 5/82/92 Short title: Datcheler v Canham. Plaintiffs: Mary Datcheler widow. Defendants: Thomas Canham, Ambrose Canham and John Canham. Subject: money matters, Surrey. Document type: bill, answer. SFP. 1686
C 5/83/9 Short title: Datcheler v Canham. Plaintiffs: Mary Datcheler widow. Defendants: Thomas Canham and others. Subject: property in Southwark, Surrey. Document type: bill only. SFP. 1687

C 6/142/35 Short title: Canham v Margetts. Plaintiffs: Thomas Canham . Defendants: George Margetts . Subject: money matters, Middlesex. Document type: bill, answer. 1659
C 6/162/104 Short title: Jackson v Canham. Plaintiffs: Thomas Jackson. Defendants: Thomas Canham and Mary Canham his wife. Subject: will of the deceased Thomas Stead, of Middlesex. Document type: bill, answer. 1663
C 6/245/47 Short title: Canham v Waterman. Plaintiffs: Thomas Canham . Defendants: Sir George Waterman kt. Subject: money matters. Document type: replication. 1683
C 6/325/41 Short title: Canham v Hamond. Plaintiffs: Thomas Canham, Samuel Warner and Katherine Warner his wife. Defendants: Thomas Hamond. Subject: marriage settlement, and lands in Great Waldingfield, Edwardstone, and Groton, Suffolk. Document type: bill, answer. 1693
C 6/521/216 Short title: Canham v [unknown]. First plaintiff: Thomas Canham. Defendants: [unknown]. Document type: bill only. Brief description taken from an 18th century listing. 1691

PROB

PROB 11/185/161 Will of Thomas Canham, Gentleman of Thetford, Norfolk. 06 February 1641

PROB 11/433/325 Will of Thomas Canham, Merchant of London. 05 August 1696
  1. G. F. Steckley (ed.), 'Letters: 1651', The letters of John Paige, London merchant, 1648-58: London Record Society 21 (1984), pp. 31-57, viewed 22/05/13
  2. G. F. Steckley (ed.), 'Letters: 1653', The letters of John Paige, London merchant, 1648-58: London Record Society 21 (1984), pp. 82-99, viewed 22/05/13
  3. G. F. Steckley (ed.), 'Introduction', The letters of John Paige, London merchant, 1648-58: London Record Society 21 (1984), pp. IX-XXXIX, viewed 22/05/13
  4. 'Thomas Canham', Family Search Community Trees, viewed 22/05/13
  5. Essex Record Office: Estate and Family records: MAJENDIE FAMILY OF CASTLE HEDINGHAM: DEEDS: D/DMh T174: Bond: 1653 , viewed 22/05/13
  6. XXX (ed.), The Fire Court: calendar to the judgments and decrees of the Court of Judicature appointed to determine differences between landlords and tennants as to rebuilding after the Great Fire, vol. 2 (XXXX, 1970), p. 264
  7. XXX (ed.), The Fire Court: calendar to the judgments and decrees of the Court of Judicature appointed to determine differences between landlords and tennants as to rebuilding after the Great Fire, vol. 2 (XXXX, 1970), p. 324
  8. [XXX Joseph Lemuel Chester, London Marriage Licences, 1521-1869 (XXXX, 1887), p.239 ], viewed 22/05/13
  9. D.J. Keene, Vanessa Harding, 'St. Mary Colechurch 105/13-15', Historical gazetteer of London before the Great Fire: Cheapside; parishes of All Hallows Honey Lane, St Martin Pomary, St Mary le Bow, St Mary Colechurch and St Pancras Soper Lane (1987), pp. 465-474, viewed 22/05/13
  10. Thomas S. Willan, The Inland trade: studies in English internal trade in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries (Manchester, 1976), p.134
  11. 'A General Court of Adventurers, April 17, 1662' (Court Book, vol. xxiv, p. 482), in Ethel Bruce Sainsbury, A calendar of the court minutes, etc., of the East India Company, 1660-1663 (Oxford, 1922), p.200, viewed 22/05/13
  12. 'A Court of Committees, April 30, 1662' (Court Book, vol. xxiv, p. 486), in Ethel Bruce Sainsbury, A calendar of the court minutes, etc., of the East India Company, 1660-1663 (Oxford, 1922), p.203, viewed 22/05/13
  13. 'A Court of Committees, February 11, 1663' (Court Book, vol. xxiv, p. 585) in Ethel Bruce Sainsbury, A calendar of the court minutes, etc., of the East India Company, 1660-1663 (Oxford, 1922), p. 295, viewed 22/05/13